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Uber security breach 'looks bad', potentially compromising all systems

Hacker is believed to have breached Uber's entire network in a social engineering attack, which one security vendor says is more extensive than the company's 2016 global data breach and access logs potentially altered.


Uber reportedly has suffered another massive security incident, which is likely more extensive than its 2016 data breach and potentially may have compromised its entire network. It also can result in access logs being deleted or altered.

A hacker on Thursday was believed to have breached multiple internal systems, with administrative access to Uber's cloud services including on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Google Cloud (GCP).


"The attacker is claiming to have completely compromised Uber, showing screenshots where they're full admin on AWS and GCP," Sam Curry wrote in a tweet. The security engineer at Yuga Labs, who corresponded with the hacker, added: "This is a total compromise from what it looks like."


Uber since had shut down online access to its internal communications and engineering systems, while it investigated the breach, according a report by The New York Times (NYT), which broke the news. The company's internal messaging platform, Slack, also was taken offline.


The hacker, who claimed to be 18 years old, told NYT he had sent a text message to an Uber employee and was able to persuade the staff member to reveal a password after claiming to be a corporate information technology personnel. The social engineering hack allowed him to breach Uber's systems, with the hacker describing the company's security posture as weak.


With the employee's password, the hacker was able to get into the internal VPN, said Acronis' CISO Kevin Reed in a LinkedIn post. The hacker then gained access to the corporate network, found highly privileged credentials on network file shares, and used these to access everything, including production systems, corporate EDR (endpoint detection and response) console, and Uber's Slack management interface.


It was not known, though, how the hacker was able to circumvent the two-factor authentication after obtaining the employee's password, Reed noted.

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